What are Bunyan Bugs Flies?

What are Bunyan Bugs Flies?


Bunyan Bugs are a series of synthetic objects used as fly rod bait in fly-fishing, designed to look like a wide variety of insects, including grasshoppers, stoneflies, Mayflies, horse flies, bumble bees, ants and caddisflies. In 1923, the Bunyan Bug was conceived, made and used for the first time. The first Bunyan Bug was a far cry from the cork body aquatic insects that are used in many parts of the United States and Canada, today. The know-how to make a fly that would ride the white water being achieved, my next desire was to make these flies represent the various insects trout feed on. This has been a never ending observation. To make a long story short, I will list the most common insects for each month of fly insects for trout. Now, relative to this “each month,” please bear in mind that this is for elevations around 3,000 feet. At lower elevations the “hatch” will be earlier and at higher elevations later; about one month difference for each one thousand feet.
 
 
"Bunyan Bugs" were designed by fly-tier and split bamboo fly rods maker Paul Bunyan (aka Norman Means) circa 1927, and originated in Montana.The construction of the Bunyan Bug is unique and has no parallel among other Montana or western trout flies. Norman's grandson, Richard Rose has kept alive a legend that Bunyan Bugs have caught mammoth trout and bass on the western rivers of the Rocky Mountains. His Bunyan Bugs have now become very collectable. Gathering the right materials to construct a Bunyan Bug is difficult, as is having the knowledge and patience required to make them. The Bunyan Bug was never tied like conventional flies. Imitation versions of the Bunyan Bug that have been tied like conventional flies have no value or represent the history of this dry fly. Today Bunyan Bugs are very rare and collectible.
 
 Materials

  • Hook: Size 4, heavy-wire, shank length about 1 1/4, also made with size 2 hook.
  • Cork Body: Just about same length as hook shank. Generally round but slightly flattened on both sides and bottom.
  • Color: Stained or painted deep orange. Segmented markings can be applied with permanent ink pens both top and bottom. Use black or dark brown ink.
  • Wings: Hair from horse mane, blonde or light sandy, inserted into front end of body so that wings will lie flat and spent.
    Tying note: Body with wings cemented in slit, should be slit (not very deep) lengthwise and placed on top of hook so that almost all of the cork body is on top.


bunyag bug flies

Reference: Wikipedia